Federal Medical Leave Act Jennifer Willis worked for Coca Cola Enterprises, Inc. (CCE), in Louisiana as a senior account manager. On a Monday in May 2003, Willis called her supervisor

Federal Medical Leave Act Jennifer Willis worked for Coca Cola Enterprises, Inc. (CCE), in Louisiana as a senior account manager. On a Monday in May 2003, Willis called her supervisor to tell him that she was sick and would not be able to work that day. She also said that she was pregnant, but she did not say she was sick because of the pregnancy. On Tuesday, she called to ask where to report to work and was told that she could not return without a doctor’s release. She said that she had a doctor’s appointment on “Wednesday,” which her supervisor understood to be the next day. Willis meant the following Wednesday. For more than a week, Willis did not contact CCE. When she returned to work, she was told that she had violated CCE’s “No Call/No Show” policy. Under this policy “an employee absent from work for three consecutive days without notifying the supervisor during that period will be considered to have voluntarily resigned.” She was fired. Willis filed a suit in a federal district court against CCE under the Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA). To be eligible for FMLA leave, an employee must inform an employer of the reason for the leave. Did Willis meet this requirement Did CCE’s response to Willis’s absence violate the FMLA Explain. [ Willis v. Coca Cola Enterprises, Inc., 445 F.3d 413 (5th Cir. 2006)]

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