Oral Contracts. Robert Pinto, doing business as Pinto Associates, hired Richard MacDonald as an independent contractor in March 1992. The parties orally agreed on the terms of employment, including payment

Oral Contracts. Robert Pinto, doing business as Pinto Associates, hired Richard MacDonald as an independent contractor in March 1992. The parties orally agreed on the terms of employment, including payment to MacDonald of a share of the company’s income, but they did not put anything in writing. In March 1995, MacDonald quit. Pinto then told MacDonald that he was entitled to $9,602.17-25 percent of the difference between the accounts receivable and the accounts payable as of MacDonald’s last day. MacDonald dis-agreed and demanded more than $83,500-25 percent of the revenue from all invoices, less the cost of materials and out processing, for each of the years that lie worked for Pinto. Pinto refused. MacDonald filed a suit in a Connecticut state court against Pinto, alleging breach of con-tract. In Pinto’s response and at the trial, he testified that the parties had an oral contract under which MacDonald was entitled to 25 percent of the difference between accounts receivable and payable as of the date of MacDonald’s termination. Did the parties have an enforceable contract? How should the court nile, and why? [MacDonald v. Pinto, 62 Conn.App. 317, 771 A.2d 156 (2001)]

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